Northern Mockingbird

A Northern Mockingbird has been terrorizing our yard for the past few days. In the two years that we have been in our home this is the first time I remember seeing one. It’s quite aggressive, and it spends a majority of it’s time squawking at us while perched in the trees that surround our backyard. This little guy even goes after Scarlett as she runs through the yard. Reminiscent of old WWII fighter planes, he’ll swoop down and get as close as he can and to try and scare her off. She doesn’t seem to be bothered by it however. If I’m being honest I’m more concerned for the bird as I know if he gets too close, Scarlett will surely grab him and that will be the end of that.

I captured the photos below with my Fujifilm X-Pro2 and Fujinon XF 55-200mm telephoto lens. I purchased the lens a little over a month ago while Fujifilm was having their summer sale. I’m quite pleased with it and I have enjoyed the increase in range it offers, especially when photographing birds in the backyard. Before this lens the longest I could photograph was 55mm. The ability to zoom into a subject and compress a scene has led to new compositions and added another facet to my photography. Over the past week or so I have been jotting down my thoughts on the 55-200 and have been kicking around the idea of a review. Stay tuned for that. For now enjoy the photos of this Northern Mockingbird.

The Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) is the only mockingbird commonly found in North America. This bird is mainly a permanent resident, but northern birds may move south during harsh weather. This species has rarely been observed in Europe. This species was first described by Linnaeus in his Systema Naturæ in 1758 as Turdus polyglottos. The northern mockingbird is known for its mimicking ability, as reflected by the meaning of its scientific name, "many-tongued mimic". The northern mockingbird has gray to brown upper feathers and a paler belly. Its tail and wings have white patches which are visible in flight.

The northern mockingbird is an omnivore, eating both insects and fruits. It is often found in open areas and forest edges but forages in grassy land. The northern mockingbird breeds in southeastern Canada, the United States, northern Mexico, the Bahamas, the Cayman Islands and the Greater Antilles. It is replaced further south by its closest living relative, the tropical mockingbird. The Socorro mockingbird, an endangered species, is also closely related, contrary to previous opinion. The northern mockingbird is listed as of Least Concern according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

The northern mockingbird is known for its intelligence. A 2009 study showed that the bird was able to recognize individual humans, particularly noting those who had previously been intruders or threats. Also birds recognize their breeding spots and return to areas in which they had greatest success in previous years. Urban birds are more likely to demonstrate this behavior. Finally, the mockingbird is influential in United States culture, being the state bird of five states, appearing in book titles, songs and lullabies, and making other appearances in popular culture. - Wikipedia


Northern Mockingbird In A Tree

— Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) in a tree in Williamstown, New Jersey on June 24, 2019 by Michael Mroczek. Photographed with a Fujifilm X-Pro2 and XF55-200mmF3.5-4.8 R LM OIS lens at 200 mm | ƒ / 10 | 1/320 sec.
Northern Mockingbird In A Tree
Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos)
Northern Mockingbird  (Mimus polyglottos) and House Finch In A Tree At Sunrise

— Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) and House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) in a tree at sunrise in Williamstown, New Jersey on June 26, 2019 by Michael Mroczek. Photographed with a Fujifilm X-Pro2 and XF55-200mmF3.5-4.8 R LM OIS lens at 190.3 mm | ƒ / 6.4 | 1/160 sec.